Taipei, Taiwan: rain, pork buns and temples

It had finally come – our family vacation to Taiwan! We had originally been planning a trip to Thailand, but the flights went up in price before John had his leave approved. So Taiwan it was! It was Chaucer who wrote that spring is when folks long to go on pilgrimage, and I can’t deny that’s what we were feeling. It was time to go. After moving every year for 6 years in a row, we were feeling the need to go somewhere. This is the longest we’ve lived in one place since having children (mind you, it’s only been a year and 4 months). John had visited China in 2015 before the kids and I were able to move out here to Okinawa with him, but when we found out the Visas to get into China were over $200 we realized we wouldn’t be able to take the whole family. So for that reason I was really excited to see Taiwan. It was about as Chinese as you could get without actually going to China. The main culture we witnessed was Chinese, as the language spoken is Mandarin, but there is also a lot of influence from Japan and other Asian countries. India even has a pretty big influence on this large island. They call Taiwan the “The heart of Asia”.

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We had booked our trip to start at the end of the rainy season, and were hoping and praying that we wouldn’t get too wet. Overall, the weather ended up being perfect, and we only had rain the first day we got in town. We were so thankful!

It was a whopping 1 hour and 25 minute flight from Okinawa – so we were in the country before 10am and had there whole day to get settled and explore. I had booked us an AirBnB apartment in the Wanhua District, which is an up and coming hip area with lots of cute cafes and coffee shops. It was also a pretty short walk to the metro station which turned out to be very helpful. Thankfully, Taipei had just opened up a new line on the metro station that took us straight from the airport to Taipei Main Station, near our apartment.

We had decided to leave all our devices at home except John’s small iPad (he still had to receive work messages). We really wanted to unplug during this vacation. When we landed we got a chip for 10 days of data and  went on our merry way. It was a bit difficult finding the place, but I had printed maps and had a phone number to reach our host. Once we found a pay phone we were able to meet up with him. The apartment we rented was super cute, with turquoise walls and Art Deco light fixtures. It was Tiny!! But really perfect, since the kids had their own room with a bunk. They were so happy to have a new space all to themselves!

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As soon as we dropped our suitcases (all two of them – read about that here) we headed out for the famous beef noodle soup of the area. Our host had given us the scoop on a great hole in the wall place nearby. It reminded us of the tiny restaurants in the Mercados of Lima, Peru. You definitely don’t go there for the atmosphere!

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Lunch at the Beef Noodle shop

But the noodles were delicious. Violet had a lot of fun playing with them.

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Olivia wasn’t too keen on them though, so she was a bit pouty through the meal – just keeping it real 😉 At least she had fun playing with the noodles after we were done eating. I’m sure this was probably not considered good manners, but I don’t think anyone saw us…lol. Generally, you’re not supposed to touch your food with your fingers at all. We ate with chopsticks for 10 days straight! Thank goodness we all knew how.

It rained all morning and into the afternoon, but after a short rest back at the apartment it had cleared up pretty nicely. We walked out to the bus station and on the way found this beautiful tree blooming with the biggest blossoms!

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Blooming tree

The city was busy, but not overwhelming. Probably 2/3 of the people rode scooters, which made things seem a little less crowded.

We got to the bus stop and boarded, but either we boarded the wrong bus, or just didn’t know how to work the system. Regardless, we jumped out at the first stop, which happened to be several blocks past where we were trying to go. We just took the scenic route 😉 We were walking to the Dihua Street area, where there are a lot of new shops and cafes that have opened in the historic buildings. Along the way we tried a green onion crepe from a street vendor. It was delicious! Cliff really liked it. Once we got to Dihua St. we saw there was a lot going on – from plays and music, to the tea cart guy who’s teapot whistled sharply through the air to alert passersby to his presence.

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Tea cart/bike guy

We bought the kids a few taro and red bean treats while we were walking.

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Red bean treat

We saw our first temple here. It was busy, with lots of locals and a few obvious tourists lighting incense and offering prayers. To who, I’m not sure.

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We continued walking and found a nice little bakery, where we grabbed a loaf of sweet taro bread for breakfast the next day (we had learned in our previous trip to have backup plans for meals, especially the first one of the day – hungry kids are not fun to travel with!). We also found many little open shops selling dried fruits, so we bought a bag of dried kiwis, pineapples, and mangos, as well as some dried figs stuffed with walnuts. Those were lifesavers on some days when the kids needed a little pick-me-up.

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Walking further down the street we finally spotted something that would satisfy us for dinner – the famous pork buns of Taiwan. Their operation was coming to a close, but we managed to grab the last few they had left. They were already washing out the pans behind the stand in the street.

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Pork bun stand

After the kids ate we hailed a taxi, since we’d walked quite a ways by now and it was getting dark. Once the kids were in bed and settled, John went out to try one of the many foot massage parlors nearby. Most of them offered hour foot massages for the equivalent of about $15 USD. We tried out a few places over the 10 day trip… It was a great first day. We were excited to see Taipei 101 the next day! The 4th tallest building in the world! More to come later…

10 days, 5 people, 2 carry-on bags

Over the past two months or so I have been on a journey to detox our home. To purge it from all the unnecessary stuff that fills my mind and clutters our space. It started with a few podcasts I’d been listening to, a book I’d been reading with a few friends, and then what sealed it was finally getting around to listening to the book called The Lifechanging Magic of Tidying Up. Friends. Can I just ask you, please read this book! It was a game changer for me. Seriously.

After listening to the book I proceeded to work through our house, starting with my own clothing, and working through the different categories such as books, papers, and kimono (miscellany categories such as bathroom, makeup, jewelry, cleaning supplies, toys, kitchen, etc.). The goal is to only keep the things that “spark joy” and to rid yourself of all the rest. It took about 8 weeks to get to a stopping point. I also worked back around to the kids clothes and John was willing to work through his closet and dresser as well. Here are some photos of my dresser and closet. These are all the clothes I own, and I’m pretty happy with that! I even have two extra drawers in my dresser now that don’t hold clothes, so I am able to use one to hold my purse’s belongings and one to hold a few gloves, hats and belts. My closet includes all season wear, even coats, scarves and robes.

We haven’t finished the house yet, as there are still about 3 major categories I want to tackle (mainly hobbies such as art, sewing, and outdoor/beach things). However, in the areas we have completed, I have filled upwards of 20 bags full of giveaway/sell and garbage.

We’ve been living this way for a few months now, and the amount of time I have back in my days is amazing. No longer  am I spending all my “extra” time tidying the numerous things in our home that weren’t bringing us joy. We have far fewer clothes, which means less laundry, less folding, and less stress for me. We have less toys, books and dishes, which means when I do need to clean up the house, it gets done much quicker than before.

What does this have to do with traveling? A lot, actually. As I’ve seen how little we actually “need” I’ve been challenged in packing, as well. We were going to be spending 10 days in Taiwan for a family vacation, but in two of the three places where we were staying we had easy access to a washer and dryer (we usually stay in AirBnBs which means you get the advantages of living in an apartment or bed and breakfast type situation). Taking that into consideration, I decided we really only needed clothing for about four days. On our trip to Hokkaido I noticed that the kids sort of wore the same few things over and over anyways (unless they got it really dirty, of course). Especially when layering, many items can be reworn for a day or two when it’s not very hot out. There were two main reasons we wanted to lighten our load for this trip:

  1. We were flying the Asian version of Spirit Airlines. It’s Peach Airlines in Asia, and it is NO-frills. You even have to pay extra to choose your seat (isn’t that what paying for a plane ticket is??).  They allow two personal items per ticketed person, with a total weight of 10kilos. That’s not much! But we were well prepared and packed into two small carry on suitcases, and our backpacks (I always carry one in place of a handbag and John carries one). The kids each had small backpacks that they can carry which holds their notebook, drawing pens, stickers and eraser toys (a favorite travel toy from the 100 Yen store in Okinawa), and also a pair of headphones for the special treat of watching a movie.
  2. The second reason was so that we can move around easier. We didn’t have a ton of suitcases to tote around, which was so nice! Especially since we were relying on public transportation (we took many trains, subways and buses). We already have three kids five years old and younger – trying to get everyone onto a train is pretty challenging (and a bit scary) even without luggage to contend with!
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Ready to jump on the metro to Taipei City!

We visited Taiwan in the spring, so the weather was cool to slightly warm (55-75 most days), with minimal rain (the rainy season usually ends in mid-March and we left on March 26th). I packed the following for our kids, including what they wore (ages 4 and 5):

  • 1 pair jeans
  • 2 pants
  • 3 long sleeve shirts
  • 2 short sleeve shirts
  • 1 pair of shorts
  • 1 pair of pajamas
  • 1 jacket/sweater
  • 1 rain jacket
  • 4 socks
  • 4 underwear
  • 1 hat
  • 1 swimsuit
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Cliff’s clothing in a medium cube

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Olivia’s clothing in a medium cube

For the baby I added an additional pair of pajamas and an extra pair of clothing, since she still needs to be changed fairly often. You can see this is a pretty bare essential list, especially considering the length of time. But it really worked out perfectly.

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Violet’s clothing in a small packing cube

I packed their swimsuits and 2 swim diapers for Violet in a separate zipper bag, just so we didn’t have to dig past them every day. We would only need them the last two days.

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Kids swimsuits

My clothing was the biggest challenge for this trip, as I realized that I really like having options. And I have always been a heavy packer (just ask my parents and grandparents, lol). But I tried to be ruthless and think of this as an experiment, and only take my very favorite of my already pared down clothing. It helped knowing that we were going to Taiwan, where they have plentiful shopping districts with discounted clothing, just in case ;). This is what I packed for myself, including what I wore:

  • 1 pair of jeans
  • 2 pair of active/hiking pants
  • 1 pair of leggings
  • 3 t-shirts
  • 2 long sleeve shirts
  • 1 pair of pajamas
  • 4 underwear
  • 2 bras
  • 4 socks
  • Toms
  • Tennis shoes
  • 1 swimsuit
  • Hat
  • 2 sweaters
  • 1 jacket
  • 1 raincoat

It felt really good to get all of my items into one packing cube!

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My clothing in a large packing cube

As it was, I still could have cut out a couple of items without missing them. The extra sweater and long sleeved shirt didn’t end up being necessary, since it was much warmer than we had anticipated. I think I’ll do better next time 😉

I only had to wash one small load of clothes in Taipei and one in Taroko Gorge. And since it wasn’t much clothing, it wasn’t burdensome to just stick it through the wash and quickly fold it up again while the kids were going to sleep in the evening. I did something similar when we went to Sapporo, though I didn’t pack nearly as light, and we ended up having way too many clothes (it was 20 degrees there, so I was a bit nervous about keeping everyone warm enough!). I had to wash a pair of pants for Olivia and a shirt for Cliff the last night in the sink in Jiaoxi, but we dried them overnight and were good to go for our flight home. Overall, it was totally worth it to have fewer suitcases.

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Waiting for our train to take us to Taroko Gorge (two suitcases, two backpacks, 1 baby bed)

I can’t wait to update y’all on our trip! It was such fun, and so nice to completely unplug for 10 days. I’ll be publishing new blogposts when I get the chance!

Hokkaido, Japan: Otaru

If you haven’t done so already, you can read about the rest of our trip in Hokkaido, Japan here: Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4.

The last day of our trip was finally here. We only had one day in Otaru, so we really packed everything in as best we could. We went to a fish market for breakfast, which was such a fun experience.

John got a roasted fish with rice, miso soup and sides, the kids got roasted salmon with rice and miso and I got the seasonal sashimi platter, complete with raw shrimp! Yikes!

These are very traditional breakfasts for the Japanese. The appetizer, that was served with the oolong tea, was dried squid. It was our first time trying it, and it was surprisingly good! John and the kids loved their fish, and I liked my sashimi platter, though it was just a bit strange eating cold fish while it was so cold out – in the morning.

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Sashimi set for breakfast

It was some of the best seafood I’ve had though! The hot tea was really nice too. The ladies who ran the fish market restaurant were so sweet, and kept talking to the kids. When they heard them playing Janken (the Japanese paper, rock, scissors game) they were so excited and came over and started talking to them in Japanese. At one point Violet got pretty rowdy and hit her head hard on the corner of the table. The sweet ladies did everything they could to console her, but the favorite was a singing and dancing cat statue they brought out. Too funny.

It was time for us to catch our bus for the aquarium after breakfast. The ride up there was so pretty, as we rounded the snowy coastline of Hokkaido.

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The aquarium was definitely a highlight of the trip. 

It was situated on top of quite a big hill, and had a gorgeous view of the ocean and nearby mountaintops.

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View from the top of the aquarium

We made it there just in time for the daily penguin walk! This was the highly anticipated moment of the trip for myself at least ;).

The penguins were all corralled outside and made a few circles around the pathway so everyone could get a good look and a good picture. They were so cute!!

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Violet had again fallen asleep out of self defense in the cold, so she missed that part, but Olivia really enjoyed it.

Cliff was so excited to have found a green snow shovel and some big piles of snow, that he barely watched the penguins! Kids can be so funny. We did manage to peel him away from his very important job for a few minutes 😉

We ended up staying for a while after the penguins left and did some sledding down the hills. John pretty much scared me half to death at one point, as I thought he was going to go right over the edge of a 30 foot drop off. The snow had all but covered the barrier, and it wouldn’t have taken much to go over! He is insane sometimes. I’m convinced I’m the only reason he’s still alive now.

We all had a really fun time though. Olivia worked hard to dig a snow slide and then we took turns sliding down on it.

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Moments like this make the difficulties of traveling with little ones worth the memories. They even convinced their mama to try out the snow slide.

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The views were amazing up there, and we thoroughly enjoyed the family time.

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We also got to see the seals, who were in a very good mood.

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Playful seals

I didn’t think the rest of the aquarium would be that appealing to us, since we have the Churumi Aquarium in Okinawa, but I was wrong! There were some of the most interesting fish and sea creatures there! The kids even got to touch an octopus! The “octopus supervisor” put this octopus away after the kids kept getting a little too close to his mouth – yikes – I think he was saying it was hungry!

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Touching the octopus – “tako” in Japanese

Lastly, we saw them feed the porpoises and saw a few more local fishes.

It was a really fun visit! Definitely worth the bus ride out. When we got back to Otaru, we took the mile and a half walk to the music box museum.

Along the way we had lunch at a local seafood restaurant. Sashimi rice bowl and grilled eel with miso soup. So delicious!

Cliff actually slept through lunch in the stroller but when he woke up we got all the kids got some street food too, since they weren’t a fan of the raw fish ;). They had corn on the cob and some sort of a fish pancake that looked pretty good. Apparently “Royce” chocolate is a really big thing in Otaru. Since my dad’s name is Royce I had to take a picture 🙂

The music box museum was in a beautiful old historical building and had wooden balconies lining the inside.

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We’d never seen so many music boxes! We had told the kids they could pick out a music box as their souvenir when we went, so we spent a while perusing the place helping them pick out the perfect ones. I regret I didn’t take any photos of the inside – it was pretty unbelievable! At one point when I went to pay, John turned his back on Violet and she piled as many music box bears as she could reach into her stroller. She either was surprised at herself or was trying to look innocent…”who, me??”

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“who, me?”

Otaru was such a cute little town. We really loved our short time there. The old buildings were so fun to see, and the canals with the rushing water along the snowy banks were like something out of a storybook.

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The canal at nighttime

We stepped into a local chocolate shop on the walk back and had some hot chocolate to warm us up.

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Hot chocolate pit stop!

We also got to check out a couple of the glass shops. I would have loved to spend hours combing the little shops, but it’s not super practical with 3 kids 5 and under! It was starting to get dark now, so we made the trek towards the ramen restaurant we’d picked out for dinner. We were excited about this one. It was ranked as one of the best restaurants in the town, and we agreed!

The ramen was absolutely delicious. The kids liked it too, and they also are the bonito fish rice and dumplings. There’s nothing like a soulful bowl of ramen to warm you up after hours of walking in the freezing cold snow! Next, we headed to the train station again to pick up our tickets for the next morning, and some bakery breads for breakfast (we’d be leaving too early to get anything then). On our walk back home we stopped in the pathway of candles and snow sculptures that snaked along the alley. Some of them were surprisingly intricate! The sculptures were a gift from the Korean country to the Japanese. It went along for blocks, and we were all pretty cold, so we didn’t get to see all of it, but what we did see of it was really beautiful.

I could hardly believe our trip had come to an end! The next morning we would pack up early and get on the 6:00 train back to Sapporo to catch our flights to Tokyo and then back to Okinawa.

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The canal outside our hotel

Traveling with three kids 5 and under…we finally did it. We were crazy, but we did it 😉

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Going home!

Hokkaido, Japan: The Chocolate Factory

If you haven’t already, you can read about day 1, day 2 and day 3 of our Hokkaido trip.
The next day was Wednesday, our last morning in Sapporo, so we made a quick stop for breakfast in our favorite cafe (or the only one we could find, really, since breakfast isn’t a very big thing in Japanese restaurants).
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Hot chocolate with breakfast – what a treat!

The newly fallen snow made everything look really fresh and beautiful. After breakfast we finished our laundry, packed up our room, and ran down to the ice sculptures to see which ones were looking the best.
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The Portland Ice Sculpture, work in progress

The international ice sculpture contest went all week and the winner was announced on Thursday, after we left Sapporo. Portland was the rep for the U.S. – it was looking good! Our favorites were Macao and Latvia, but they were all pretty amazing. Macao ended up winning First Place on Thursday, and Latvia was the Runner Up.
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The Latvia Ice Sculpture, work in progress

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The Macao Ice Sculpture, work in progress

After that we grabbed our luggage and took a taxi to the Chocolate Factory. Cliff’s birthday is on Valentine’s Day, and we were just a few days out, so we celebrated it by taking them to the Shiroi Koibito Factory, courtesy of Grandma and Poppy.
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The courtyard of Shiroi Koibito Factory

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Clock Tower and Courtyard

The factory was beautiful. It was like something out of a fairy tale! A huge clocktower stood at the edge of the courtyard, and inside the courtyard there were dozens of little playhouses, each with its own little kitchen or bed.
Inside the Factory, Cliff and Olivia got to go into the kitchen and decorate their own cookies.
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All “chefed” up!

Cliff decorated a cookie in the shape of Hokkaido, and Olivia decorated a heart cookie. They both did a great job!

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The birthday boy and his finished cookie!

We had lunch after cookies (priorities, right?!), then the kids played in the little town of playhouses outside, had a snowball fight, and warmed up indoors in the kids play area for a bit.
Next we went on a factory tour to see the line where they assemble the chocolate sandwich cookies (which are out of this world delicious – I only wish we’d bought more).
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Checking out the chocolate cookie assembly line

Before leaving we had to try out the cafe located on the top floor, overlooking the clock tower and the park grounds below. We all got a parfait and John and I shared a coffee. It was delicious! By the time we were done it was nearly dark out. It was time for our fairytale experience to come to an end.
We called a taxi and he drove us to the train station again where we boarded our train for Otaru, about another half hour from the edge of Sapporo. The snow was so deep everywhere, from the snowfall the night before.
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Walking to the train station

It was about 19 degrees out at that point, but we were all pretty well bundled. The kids were all troopers, and they loved getting on the train (though Cliff fell asleep in my lap about 4 minutes after we started moving).
We got into Otaru after dark, but our hotel was a straight walk down from the station. We were glad we just decided to walk, even though it was so cold, because the town was beautiful all lit up!
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Ice lanterns were everywhere!

Nearly every little shop and restaurant had ice globes with candles inside them. It was gorgeous! There were also quite a few snow sculptures along our walk. We found these fun sculptures of seals and frozen fish inside of ice blocks!
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Seals and fish!

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We found the minions!

We were staying right on the canal, in a beautiful old historic hotel. It really felt like we’d stepped back in time. The town had a European feel to it (I say that, but I’ve yet to go to Europe!) with lots of cafes, chocolate shops, glass shops and music box shops.
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Our pretty girl on the canal!

After we got settled into our new hotel room (which felt huge after our tiny double twin room in Sapporo), we ventured out for some dinner, again to no avail. We’ve made a decision to never again try to find food in a new city on the night we get in town, if it’s after 6pm. We almost always strike out!
Though we walked into half a dozen restaurants and street food shops they were all either closed or closing. We finally settled for the bakery food we’d bought at the train station and the cookies the kids had decorated at the chocolate factory. It was a strange dinner, but you do what you gotta do. We tried to make it fun for the kids, though Olivia reminded us the next morning that she’d only had pastries and cookies for dinner the night before (parenting fail!). We only had one day left in Hokkaido, so we were soon out the door for breakfast and exploring. More coming soon!

Hokkaido, Japan: Tsudome Site

If you haven’t read about our first two days in Hokkaido, you can do that here and here. On Tuesday, we took the subway from Sapporo Station to another area of the Snow Festival, the Tsudome site. It was an adventure just using the subway system.

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About to get on the subway

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We made it to Tsudome – grumpy kids and all…

Growing up in Texas, neither John nor I were that savvy with subways to begin with. But we thankfully managed to figure it out without any English words to help us along!

The Tsudome Site was full of sledding, tubing, bike skiing, snow ball fights and snow men building. It was all free, too!

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Do you wanna build a snow man? 😉

We did a few of the activities outside and then ventured inside the dome to warm up for a bit. It was a really cold day, with a pretty good windchill. This was pretty much the only time Violet showed any interest in getting out of her stroller or ergo the entire week.

There were tons of inflatable rides and activities for kids inside the dome.

We took an hour or so to let the kids play and then had lunch (another bowl of steaming ramen for me, please. Thank you very much). They loved this humongous inflated slide, and I cracked up laughing when I realized they were going down it backwards! They are so funny!

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Hang on for your lives!!

The kids had been begging for ice cream, so we decided to let them try it. All the ice cream here is made with fresh Hokkaido milk, and it is delicious. The Japanese eat ice cream anytime, but especially when it’s cold out, for some reason. I could barely get mine down, it was so cold outside, but it was nice not to have to worry about it melting!

After lunch Violet passed out in the stroller, so we took the time to do some snow slides with the kids. We all tried the small tubing slide, and then the ice slides.

The kids did the bike skiing again. They probably enjoyed that the most.

Before we left we had to do the huge monster tube slide! The catch with this one is there was only one person allowed per tube, so the kids had to go down by themselves. I was so proud of them for doing it! I was even scared going down! Snow may look soft, but it can be pretty hard when it’s all compacted in there.

Just before we left it started snowing pretty hard.

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Me and my big girl

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Catching snow flakes!

We took the bus back to the subway station and then walked back to our hotel through Odori Park for another look at the sculptures.

The kids recognized this guy and it led to an interesting conversation where John and I came to the realization that our children may know pop culture better than we do.

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PPAP

It’s okay, we googled it. Pen Pineapple Apple Pen or PPAP for those of you who are really hip. And we finally understand what they’ve been singing at home (they’d been singing it with a distinct Japanese flair to the words, so I hadn’t even caught on that what they were saying was in English!)

That night we decided to go out to the mall for some dinner. It was cool walking around a local fancy mall, but the restaurant we wanted to eat at ended up having an hour and a half wait. So we settled for an Udon restaurant.

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The Udon Set we ordered for the kids

It was pretty good, but not quite what we were hoping for. Traveling sure requires a lot of flexibility. Especially when you’re traveling with little ones. A long wait for a great dinner isn’t worth it if everyone is miserable.

When we left the mall the snow was really coming down – so instead of walking back to the subway we took a taxi.

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It’s snowing!!

We played in the snow a bit when we got to the hotel, until we were all miserably cold. Olivia and John even made a little snow man. Traveling with little ones is never easy, but it can be pretty fun at times too 😉

Iquitos: On the Amazon River

Our second day in the Amazon just happened to be Easter Sunday. It was a very quiet morning in Iquitos and we had a little trouble finding an open place for breakfast. We managed to find one though, named for the movie that was filmed in the Amazon, Fitzcarraldo. I haven’t seen the movie yet, but the restaurant was not much to write home about. Still, at least we had satisfied our hunger and were ready for the day. We grabbed a couple snacks and some blended coconut drinks and decided to hop on a boat for a tour. 

Boats along the river

Boats along the river

Olivia and Aunt Katelyn

Olivia and Aunt Katelyn

 Our tour guide told us he could take us to both Monkey Island and the Butterfly Farm. The boat was great. A narrow wooden boat with two boards running along the sides and a couple hammocks hung in the middle. It was nice and cool with the breeze blowing off the water.  We got to see the colors of the river change as we merged from one river into the other.  

Rivers merging

Rivers merging

 Not long after that, we had already arrived at what appeared to be Monkey Island. We walked up the planks to the floating platform and were greeted by several very friendly monkeys. 

The monkeys were happy to see us

The monkeys were happy to see us

The kids were pretty hesitant and Cliff definitely kept his distance. As soon as you had anything in your hands they would climb right up your legs and jump to the fruit! 

Looking for a snack

Looking for a snack

Katelyn and the Monkey

Katelyn and the Monkey

It was pretty funny to experience.

Next, they took us to see different animals found in the surrounding environment. Unfortunately, we discovered later that this was NOT the real “Monkey Island” but was an operation that draws tourists in by paying tour guides to bring them under false pretenses. We enjoyed getting to see the wildlife up close, but felt bad that we’d unwillingly and unknowingly supported a place like that!

Bridge to the animals

Bridge to the animals

Holding a sloth

Holding a sloth

Happy with a full tummy

Happy with a full tummy

Unfortunately, it’s very hard to find specific information on places online and when you speak to your guides they usually tell you what you want to hear. So for those of you who are going to Iquitos, make sure you are very clear with your guide about where he is taking you, and know how long it should take to get there.

Holding the Macaw...Olivia wasn't so sure about this.

Holding the Macaw…Olivia wasn’t so sure about this.

Our next stop was the Butterfly Farm. We thought we were going to the Pilpintuwassi Butterfly Farm, which is a rescue center for jungle wildlife around Peru.  However, it wasn’t until afterwards that we realized no where had we seen the name anywhere….again we had been duped.

It was really neat seeing the lifecycle of the Amazon butterflies up close. Olivia loved all the caterpillars and was very excited to get to hold a couple of them.

Caterpillar

Caterpillar

We saw all the life stages, from the eggs, to tiny caterpillars, to the large caterpillars, chrysalis and cocoons, and butterflies.

Holding a butterfly

Holding a butterfly

Then we got to see the butterfly house, where the butterflies fed on fruit and flowers. At the end, our guide let us release two butterflies from the cages and then picked some fruit off a tree to send with us. The fruit was reminiscent of a lime, and they eat it dipped in salt. They told us pregnant women in Iquitos love it, and I approved :). It was pretty refreshing in that heat!

More about our time in the Amazon coming soon!

Cartagena: Within the Walled City

Our last night we stayed in the walled city.

Inside the walled city

Inside the walled city

Walking through the city

Walking through the city

 We had quite an adventure trying to find dinner that night.  After checking into our hotel we loaded the kids up in the stroller and walked outside the walls to what looked like a promising restaurant on TripAdvisor.  We walked up and down the dark street, navigating piles of trash along the broken up pieces of sidewalk.  Cartagena wasn’t unlike most other cities we’d visited in South America in that respect.  We finally gave up locating the restaurant and headed back to the walled city.  We thought we’d have an easier time finding a good eatery there, but it also proved challenging.  Eventually, we stumbled upon a tiny local, over-decorated and somewhat dusty Colombian restaurant.  The food was decent, and at that point we didn’t really care too much anyways!  It was bedtime already for the kids, so we ordered some coconut rice as soon as we sat down in our chairs and they started chowing down.  Coconut rice was the kids favorite Colombian treat (after Arepas, of course).  It was browned and sweet, cooked in coconut water, and went great with the local whole fried fish they served up in Cartagena.  Dinner was long and a little painful with two very sleepy toddlers, but we survived!  The next morning we got an early start.  The breakfast at the hotel was wonderful and the kids loved all the fresh juices.  After that, we started out on a walk around the Walled City.

Walking through the city

Walking through the city

At the edge of the city

At the edge of the city

The lookouts were really fun to see.  Took us a while to find an empty one!  Popular place!

Hola!

Hola!

Hanging out in the sun

Hanging out in the sun

 From the opening you could see the Caribbean, just across the road.  It was hot, hot, hot, by this time.  We were glad for a little shade.

Me and my girl

Me and my girl

In the lookout

In the lookout

Enjoying Cartagena

Enjoying Cartagena

 We’d promised the kids another ice cream popsicle, so we headed back to the center of the city.

Cliff loves "caballos"

Cliff loves “caballos”

At the city's center

Livi and daddy

Buying some fresh squeezed orange juice

Buying some fresh squeezed orange juice

Enjoying the city

Enjoying the city

 While we were waiting for it to open, we grabbed some iced coffees for us adults at a delicious local coffee shop.

Being "patient" in the coffee shop

Being “patient” in the coffee shop

Iced Colombian coffee!

Iced Colombian coffee!

 The kids were good, with the promise of ice cream looming, and soon they were holding their fruity ice cream pops.

La Paletteria

La Paletteria

Delicious ice cream popsicles

Delicious ice cream popsicles

Happy kids

Happy kids

 It was almost time for us to leave this beautiful place, but we had one more fun thing planned….the hotel pool.

Splish-splash!

Splish-splash!

Fun times!

Fun times!

 Just seconds after this picture, Cliff plummeted into the water.  He’s a tough boy though, and was laughing it off just a few minutes later.

Fun with daddy

Fun with daddy

 Olivia was super excited to get to use her “eye-gols” again.  Those kids crack me up sometimes.  It was a great end to our time in Colombia.

Beautiful warm people and bright colors

Beautiful warm people and bright colors

We’d really enjoyed this country!